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and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something does not make it so, and issuin
by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone, tom hudson is on assignment. jeff yastine joins us. the federal reserve kept its key interest rate at zero, but said it's ready to take action to boost the economy when the time is right. that announcement came today as the fed wrapped up its policy meeting in washington. susie, one thing that stood out at this meeting is the fed is getting more worried about inflation. the problem is, inflation is too low, and below what the fed considers acceptable. >> susie: that could be the catalyst for the fed to pump more money into the economy. so what will the central bank do next? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: two more meetings. one two-day event in early november, the other in mid december. that's the window the fed has left this year to boost the economy. but, whether the central bank eases monetary policy in the next few months depends on what happens with the economy. and, fed watcher dana saporta says it's clear now that policymakers have linked their next move to inflation, or more specifically, the lack of it. >> i think the fed is loath to
the treasury yields are telling us, that i think that september might be true to form. >> reporter: as to why september historically is so grim for stocks, experts have a few theories. some say investors refocus on their portfolios after summer vacation. others speculate many americans sell stocks in the fall to pay hefty tuition bills. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report," new york. >> susie: here are the stories in tonight's nbr newswheel. a mixed close on the last trading day of the month. the dow added five points, the nasdaq lost six, and the s&p 500 edged up a fraction. volume climbed a bit from yesterday's pace-- 1.4 billion shares on the big board and 2.1 billion on the nasdaq. minutes from the fed's latest policy meeting show some members think the central bank should provide more support if the economy weakens further. fed officials eventually agreed to reinvest the proceeds from their huge mortgage bond portfolio into treasuries. single family homes in major cities saw a modest price increase in june. the s&p/case shiller home price index rose 1% from may. but economists warn t
street today, and in the offices of many u.s. banks. not only are the new capital standards looser than expected, but there's nearly a ten-year phase-in-- considered an eternity in the marketplace. experts say the so-called basel 3 requirements eliminate some uncertainty for financial stock investors, who were worried the rules would be tougher. k.b.w.'s fred cannon says, more importantly, they should help banks do business more cautiously. >> it means that there is risk retention for the banks. if they make a loan or do a mortgage securitization or subprime loan, they are going to have to take some risk and hold it on their balance sheet. and, that's a good thing because that's clearly one of the issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now we see a number of bank
, those are the two words president obama used today to describe the pace of growth in the u.s. economy. and the economy was a big topic at his white house news conference this morning. >> tom: the other big topic, susie, was the president's announcement of his new top economic advisor. he's austan goolsbee. goolsbee has been on the president's economic team. he now becomes chairman of the white house council of economic advisors, replacing christina romer, who left to return to teaching. >> susie: the president used today's press briefing to push his agenda for reviving the economy, from tax breaks to a small business jobs bill. washington bureau chief darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the president today acknowledged what many americans know too well-- economic progress has been painfully slow. still, he urged voters to stay the course this on election day. >> if it was just a referendum on whether we have made the progress we need to, then people around the country will say that we are not there yet. if the election is about the policies that are going to move us forward, versus the
is probably behind us. the concern about a double dip is over and that now we should take advantage of the favorable seasonals in particular now that the mid term elections will soon be over. >> tom: the blue chips surge nearly 200 points, closing out a fourth straight week to the upside. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 24. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. the bulls are back on wall street. tom, investors were enthusiastic on some encouraging economic news: orders in august for things like machinery and computers were stronger than expected. >> tom: susie, this is the fourth week in a row that the major stock averages were positive and in a big way. let's run down the numbers from today's action. the dow jumped almost 200 points. the nasdaq added 54 and the s&p 500 rose 24. those indexes were up roughly 2% eac
, the yen, and bought u.s. dollars. the idea is to drive down the value of the yen versus the dollar, making japan's currency cheaper. >> wolfgang koester is the c.i.a. at a firm that. welcome back to "nightly business report." what companies do you think get hurt by this japanese yen intervention? >> the people that are going to get hurt are the people that are looking to -- that have costs in japan, more than the people that are looking at the revenues. what is really important is for corporations and their investors to understand where the corporations have the exposures on the revenue, as well as the costs. for example, net exposure side. >> tom: so when you're talking about the cost side, these are companies that have some kind of manufacturing or services based in japan that could get hurt by this intervention, right? >> precisely. that's absolutely correct. that's what we're seeing at fireapps. we're seeing companies coming and looking and trying to see how this yen appreciation impacts them, and there is a focus on the second part of this, which is the cost focus. >> tom: i imagine a
investment strategist sam stovall says investors are less worried about the u.s. slipping into another recession. >> we're getting better than expected economic data which is making investors believe that we are now moving further and further from the deflation and double digit precipice and as a result that pushed share prices out of the 100 point range we've been experienced since april of this year and now i believe from a technical perspective we're going to challenge that april 23rd high. >> susie: while stocks are having a break out september, the housing market remains stalled. fewer new homes were sold than expected in august, confirming that housing has yet to recover. purchases were unchanged, matching july as the second worst month since 1968. as suzanne pratt reports, it could be 2012 before housing market conditions get back to normal. >> reporter: at halstead property in hoboken new jersey, there's only one word to describe business: inconsistent. a stone's throw from manhattan's stronger real estate market hoboken offers buyers everything from modern condos to historic b
from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. gold prices have never been this high, suzanne, topping $1,277 an ounce in today's trading. >> suzanne: tom, gold's not the only metal shining on wall street. silver is at a 30-year high, closing at $20.82 an ounce. >> tom: been quite some rally, but the high prices metals are getting aren't scaring off buyers. as scott gurvey reports, the big rally in metals is expected to continue. >> reporter: five records in six weeks. it seems all that glitters on the futures exchanges are contracts in gold. analysts at goldman sachs, the royal bank of scotland and deutsche bank all published research notes making the case for the yellow metal today. analyst jim steel at h.s.b.c. says there are many reasons to expect the trend to continue. >> we still have a lot of financial market fragility, a lot of uncertainty about the economy going forward. we've had the reintroduction of quantitative easing, and we've also had a lot of
>> susie: president obama says more needs to be done to boost the u.s. economy-- a lot more. >> the hole the recession left was huge, and progress has been painfully slow. millions of americans are still looking for work. >> tom: he defended his push for an extension of middle class tax cuts, and said extending tax cuts for the wealthy just doesn't make sense. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. "painfully slow." tom, those are the two words president obama used today to describe the pace of growth in the u.s. economy. and the economy was a big topic at his white house news conference this morning. >> tom: the other big topic, susie, was the president's announcement of his new top economic ad
for joining us for this labor day special edition. the jobs picture just keeps getting worse. tom, back in january, the economy was adding jobs and the recovery was gaining momentum. then europe's debt woes exploded and the global recovery came to a grinding halt. >> tom: susie, the latest employment numbers aren't much help. 54,000 jobs disappeared from u.s. payrolls in august, and the unemployment rate hit 9.6 >> susie: so how bad is the employment picture, and how long will it take to get back to where we were before the recession started? suzanne pratt puts it in perspective. >> reporter: it seems lately that signs like these are extremely hard to come by. even though the great recession may technically be over, the labor market is far from recovered. the nation's unemployment rate hit 10% late last year and has hovered just below there ever since. but economist dan greenhaus says that widely quoted number understates the magnitude of the job crisis and the inequalities within it. >> if you're an advanced degree white guy working not in construction, you're fine. it's like 4.5%. it'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)